We talked to photographer Muir Vilder about his extraordinary series 'Rebels without a Pause' and asked him how the series has changed his thinking on age.

Words and images by Muir Vilder.

I think age matters as much as you let it. Working on this photo-series made me more aware that you shouldn’t take things too seriously and should make an effort to avoid being boring. Rebels Without a Pause, is a portrait series of Britain’s ageing rebels and mavericks.

I met a 65 year old man dancing in a leather harness in a gay club in Brixton and thought it was great that he wasn’t letting his age define his behaviour, so I found other, similiar people to photograph as a celebration of that attitude.

"'For me it's fantastic to be in the company of younger people. I find my contemporaries dreadfully boring. Sometimes they shout at me to grow up but I think they're just jealous."

Adrian Delgoffe.

Mick and Peggy Warner by Muir Vilder.

Selected quotes from Muir's interview with the rebels:

Mick and Peggy Warner:

Mick: ‘We was all in the Isle of Wight when we saw a Ted with two girls in a cafe. I pointed him out to my son and said, ‘that's what you want to be my boy’. So he did didn't he. We didn't force him like. He liked it and started bopping. But he don't no more though. Even though we always got our hair in and wear all the gear we're too old to bop now. I used to do the smooch with Peg but I can't even do that anymore now. It makes my blooming back ache. So that put the Kibosh on that.’

John G. Byrne by Muir Vilder.

Adrian Delgoffe: 'For me it's fantastic to be in the company of younger people. I find my contemporaries dreadfully boring. Sometimes they shout at me to grow up but I think they're just jealous. I didn't have much of a youth. I was always either ill or with old people. I think I'm reverting back to a childhood I didn't have.’

John G. Byrne: ‘I'm an original skinhead from 1969, however like most gay skins I still see myself as being young. I like to knock around with younger people and get used to the new things. All the young guys I know now are always talking about ‘poonani’. It makes me feel up to date and younger to keep up with new slang. I suppose in 10 or 20 years people will stop saying ‘poonani’.’

Isobel Varley: ‘I first got tattooed when I was 48. I liked it so much I just kept going for it. I've also got piercings. I've pierced my ears, nose, nipples, bellybutton, clitoris and everywhere else. I've done some wild things in my life but I've no regrets. I love my tattoos and I'm really glad I've had them done.’ 

Isobel Varley to the right by Muir Vilder.

This photo-series was originally featured on www.accent-magazine.com 

View more of Muir's work here www.muirvilder.com